Regardless of grade level, exams are an integral part of the academic calendar.  As parents, helping our children prepare for all of these assessments can be a challenge. These few strategies will help you optimize these study periods. Make a schedule: Exam dates are usually given in advance. To help you not forget these dates,

October is Learning Disability Awareness month. A learning disability is not something that a person can outgrow, and it does not go away. Students with learning disabilities must recognize that they are not dumb, slow, unsuccessful, or any of the other negative labels that children who have learning disabilities may feel apply to them. In

Special Education teachers are beginning to plan and write Individual Education Plans. Here is what you can expect if your child is formally identified as an exceptional student or has an IEP for another reason. IEP: Individual Education Plan What is it? An IEP is an individualized written plan describing the program and/or services required

Summer is ending We all love the laid-back pace of summer. The long hazy and lazy days, not being on a demanding schedule, and actually stopping to smell the roses. This time of year is magical, and it offers many benefits to parents and children alike. Summer can also be a time of reflection on

Whether your child is starting school for the first time or returning after the summer break, the start of the school year brings a great deal of excitement, together with some anxiety and stress. A little planning and preparation can ease a lot of the uncertainty and help make the first day of school an

Reading is a gateway through which children can explore and engage with the words on a page, as well as advance skills that are essential to school success and development. Your child has worked hard all school year to achieve his or her current literacy levels. Finding ways to encourage your children to read throughout

It’s report card time! Which means it’s the perfect time for reflection and planning. At this time of the year, parents should be able to look back and list the things that were learned in each subject, as well as what areas could use some improvement or enrichment. In fact, your children should be the

Since the 2011-2012 school year, all schools in Québec have been using a standardized report card implemented by the Ministère. This report card ensures parents receive clear and consistent information about their child’s progress. Whether your child is in elementary or secondary school, you will receive a report card at the end of each term.

Over the summer holidays, students are at risk of a significant loss of academic skills.  Studies have indicated that this loss can be the equivalent of a month of instruction, as well as up to two months for students from disadvantaged areas.  When school starts again, the student therefore has to dedicate a substantial amount

It’s report card time, the perfect time for reflection and for planning. At this time in the year, parents should be able to look back and list things that were learned in each subject, as well as areas that could use some improvement or enrichment. In fact, your children should be the ones to tell

5 suggestions to increase academic motivation Teenagers are tempted by many pleasures, immediate and ephemeral. They live in the present, and their future is far for them! In their quest for autonomy, they need to feel that they control their life, that their parents no longer have so much power over them. The lack of

No matter what age your child is there are things you can do as a parent to help them learn to read and write. Here are some tips to start using today! Birth to toddler years Talk to your baby and bombard them with words – the more words you expose your child to the

by  Houda Nasreddine Literacy acquisition can be quite the challenge given the multitude of skills a child must first develop in order to learn how to read. The average child needs to first acquire phonological awareness, that is, learn the sounds that make up language. They need to be able to play with sound structures

by Ashley Cooper & Ashley Rego According to the Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, 1 in 10 Canadians have a learning disability. A learning disability can be described as a gap between the level of achievement that is expected and what is actually achieved. Contrary to popular belief, learning disabilities can affect people with average

Advocating for your child at school In a follow-up to our “Tips from a Principal” webinar, educator and principal Nancy Lerner shares her experience when it comes to advocating for your child at school. As parents, we never stop advocating for our children, no matter what their age. Advocacy in schools is very helpful as

Parent-teacher interviews are a great way to find out how your child is doing in school and to show your interest in your child’s learning and classroom experiences. A 10-15 minute parent-teacher interview can give you insight as to how your child is doing, where your child needs to improve and how you can help.

Whether your child is starting school for the first time or returning after a summer break, the start of the school year brings a great deal of excitement, together with some anxiety and stress. A little planning and preparation can ease much of the uncertainty and help to make the first day an enjoyable experience

It’s that time of year…back to school! For some children and parents, this is a time of excitement. For others, it is a time of worry and anxiety. We’ve asked our experts for their advice on how to reduce this anxiety when it comes to heading back to school. Lauren Robinson, speech-language pathologist, shares: Preview

Strategies parents can implement to manage school anxiety Times of transition or change can be stressful and anxiety-provoking for many children, especially the transition from the ever-anticipated summer break to school in September. In the days leading up to the first day of school, your child may become irritable, withdrawn and engage in frequent tantrums.

Working with an interprofessional team As a parent, you do everything you can to encourage and provide the foundation your child needs to reach their potential. But what happens if your child is struggling with a developmental or genetic disorder, or mental health concern? What are the common issues to accessing services? How can an

During a child’s first five years of life, she is starting to explore books and to learn about writing and reading. From grades one to three, a great majority of a child’s time at school is spent learning to read. From grade four and onward a child is using her reading skills and is reading to

“It’s not your imagination: children who are struggling with mental health, neurodevelopmental, and behavioural challenges are more likely to be bullied—and/or to bully—other children.”
Ann Douglas is the author of numerous books about pregnancy and parenting, including Parenting Through the Storm: How to Handle the Highs, the Lows, and Everything in Between (a guide to parenting a child with a mental health, neurodevelopmental, or behavioural challenge).

Our “Raising a bilingual child: The top five myths” webinar with Caroline Erdos was a popular and questions from bilingual homes are still coming in. Here we share more questions that have been sent in from both educators and parents, along with Dr. Erdos’ expert answers:

Watch our webinar “Raising a bilingual child: The top five myths” If you missed our “Raising a bilingual child: The top five myths” webinar with Dr. Caroline Erdos and Mary Jose Guerrier you can watch it here: Your Hosts: Dr. Caroline Erdos, Speech Language Pathologist and Mary Jose Guerrier, Program Manager with Morneau Shepell. Myths

A guide to the benefits of interprofessional care for families & children   Our latest guide on the benefits of an interprofessional approach to care for children and teens is now available. Download your copy today! An interprofessional approach looks like this: 1+1=3. This means that for a child who needs behaviour, speech and occupational

Watch our latest webinar: Tips from a principal If you missed our “Tips from a principal: How to advocate for your child at school” webinar with Nancy Lerner and Allison Leach you can watch it here: Your Hosts: Nancy Lerner, Educational Consultant and Allison Leach, Ontario Certified Teacher Nancy Lerner holds a Master’s degree in Communicative

Who wants to think about school over the summer? Parents do! When children have long breaks without regular opportunities to practice reading and other skills they need in school, they often need extra time to get back into the swing of things when they return to school in the fall. Research shows that students lose

Online Therapy and Learning Services Exciting news! We now offer online therapy and learning services. From the comfort of your home – or just about anywhere with a high-speed internet connection – your child can participate in one on one therapy, live with their therapist or educator. No complicated equipment is needed just a tablet or

Did you know that 1 in 10 Canadians has a learning disability? Ranging from mild to severe, learning disabilities can include challenges with reading, writing, mathematics and concepts related to time. Mild learning disabilities often go undiagnosed leading to challenges in the classroom and the assumption that the child is unmotivated, lazy or unintelligent. In

Helping your child improve their report card results Soon, if they haven’t already, your child will be bringing home their latest report card.  As a parent, you are an expert on your child, while your child’s teacher is a grade level expert. These reports help parents understand their child’s grade level as well as their